shes-a-rebel-shes-a-sa-aint:

perfectionstoomainstream:

I’ve saved this since March to post.

I FUCKING LOVE YOU YES YES YES I WAS THINKING THIS TODAY TOO I POSTED IT EVERYWHERE

(via andiree)

sulphursun:

…….

i should explain

(via coffeeandcockatiels)

masturbation-is-illegal:

marielovesgroban:

Don’t forget we have to wake up Green Day tomorrow.

image

(via ihategeese)

You have such a huge fan base and it’s such an interesting show. Do your fans ask you for anything unusual? It being such an unusual show.

(Source: fionagoddess, via caligulette)

duskygrayknights:

but morning person + not morning person could make the worst (or maybe the best?) otp

"Gooooood morning dear :)" "fuck you and everything you stand for"

(Source: darkmetineknight, via babydollmccall)

monroeshenanigans:

ars-arcanum:

herokick:

How a Kamui Transformation actually looks like to outside viewers. From Episode 2. 

i mean no wonder no-one’s stopping her transformations would YOU want to get into the middle of that?

Best magical girl transformation ever

(via iamtonysexual)

(Source: tamababy, via kingmunsterxvii)

,,

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday.

Saluden Muchachxs, saluden.

(via frijoliz) Thank you frijoliz for blogging my essay and evelynthedesigner for letting me know. And unending gracias for 17k notes! Muchos saludos a todos. (via whiterhinoray)

(via minuiko)

witchcraftings:

chubrubqueen:

cdnpgn:

Winter sore throat “tea”- In a jar combine lemon slices, organic honey and sliced ginger. Close jar and put it in the fridge, it will form into a “jelly”. To serve- spoon jelly into mug and pour boiling water over it. Store in fridge 2-3 months.

Reblogging this in case any of you little jelly beans get sick (◡‿◡✿)

Super useful for this coming winter!

(Source: , via toriinn)